Sep 13

How many clients can a Cisco 3702 AP service before service degrades?

I understand that the proper answer to this question is “It depends”. But, my goal is to find the number of simultaneous wireless telephone calls that can be made while attached to the same Cisco 3702 series access point (AP) and same radio A or B/G? I’m not looking for a book answer, I have already found the Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7925G Deployment Guide. On Page 42 is states 13 calls at 6 Mbps, 20 calls at 12 Mbps, and 27 calls at 24-54 Mbps.


So what is the reality of the 3702 series AP? That’s my question. Using a Cisco 7921/7925 IP phone, How many calls have you had going on your network before people started complaining?

On a Cisco 1252 AP, I found that once I hit 14-20 clients running terminal emulation software, the performance was very poor. The clients were using Telnet and it took a long time for the users to login and get their first assignment.

What about running a telephone application like the Shortel client. This client is loaded on a smartphone and makes calls over the WiFi. Have any of you used this client on a Cisco Wireless network? If so, what APs and controllers did you use? How was your experience?

Placing my configuration aside, can you give me good feedback about your experience with these products?

Jun 09

Is it worth upgrading that old network device?

I used to have the opinion of performing software upgrades on old equipment to bring the software version up to a modern version. I have had issues in the past and the vendor refuses to help me until I perform a software upgrade. So, to avoid lack of support, I always wanted to have my equipment on newer version.


Recently, I have had a change of heart on this. I recently performed some software upgrades on some Cisco 2106 wireless controllers that have been in place for years. Version 6.x was no longer supported and I had to have the controller on version 7.x for support reasons. After my upgrades were done, I was left with a large number of failed access points that could not handle the upgrade.

Last weekend I traveled to a remote site to perform a software upgrade to another Cisco Wireless Controller, that upgrade went very well. While I was there, I thought I would upgrade the software on the Cisco 6509 and a couple of 3560G switches in the data center. The software on these switches were well over 4 years old, so I thought I would upgrade them. The 6509 upgrade went well. As I performed reboot on the 3560G, it blew a puff of smoke out of the fan vent and died. After scrambling to find a spare 3560 (Not G), I was able to get it replaced. When I get a replacement switch, I get to replace it again with the correct type of switch.

Due to the hardware failures, I’m not so sure I will be performing software upgrades on old network devices unless I am having a problem with it. Then when I do, I’ll have the expectation that it’s going to fail.

What is your opinion about performing software upgrades on network equipment that is not having issues?
My failures were with Cisco equipment, Do you see the same failures on other vendors equipment?